A brief history of Krotona Court

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A brief history of Krotona Court

During the more sedately spiritual Krotona occupation, the front building housed a kitchen, dining room, vegetarian cafeteria and lecture rooms until Krotona relocated to Ojai in 1924. The building, then called the Krotona Court, was designed by San Diego-based architecture firm of Mead & Requa. Every era at Krotona seems to bring a fresh interpretation of the Theosophical Society’s mission: to explore the inexplicable...

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New postcard of Rupert Julian, found on eBay!

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New postcard of Rupert Julian, found on eBay!

I got a little excited about this one - it's not every day a new image of Rupert crosses my desk! Just at a guess, I'd say this one is probably from around 1914-15, when he was an up & coming actor in Hollywood, but not the moustached director he would become later...

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"My god - he's making a Dietrich out of her!" Lighting Masterclass w/ director Josef Von Sternberg (1969)

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"My god - he's making a Dietrich out of her!" Lighting Masterclass w/ director Josef Von Sternberg (1969)

How wonderful - I'd read about one of Von Sternberg's masterclasses years ago in Kevin Brownlow's (AMAZING) book on the silent era, The Parade's Gone By, but I never expected to be able to watch one!

For anyone with an interest in the history of Hollywood and filmmaking in the early days, I can't recommend that book highly enough; Brownlow doesn't just deal with the dates & places, he interviewed surviving cast & crew in the fifties and sixties, and got their first-hand stories of life at the time. It's a wonderfully engaging read.

Thanks to the Australian Cinematographers Society for posting this!

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Winter Hall quoted in the Auckland Star, 1926

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Winter Hall quoted in the Auckland Star, 1926

"The main objection I have to the picture work is the amount of idle time which one has to put in during the filming of a picture. The 'waits' are appallingly burdensome. On one occasion I was told to be ready, in full evening dress, for a scene at 9 o'clock on a Monday morning. I waited all day Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, from 9 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. The scene was 'shot' finally at 4 p.m. on Thursday. The delay was apparently unavoidable, but, to me, exceedingly irksome. This was an unusual case, but it illustrates to a large degree what picture actors have to put up with in the way of idle time..."

(Plus ça change!)  This one's not specifically Rupert-related, of course, but an interesting comment on the industry of the time - from the Auckland Star article referred to in his biography at NZ On Screen.

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